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in education. you see more young men majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace you see more women going into nonprofits. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more men and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man an and a woman in an investment bank, face both start at goldman sachs, those should be paid to sing. they are paid the same. if they are not there are avenues to pursue, but that's a big difference. >> what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> well, i think the white house needs have a council on men and boys. you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less e
of pharmaceutical drugs such as education on minimizing intake, revamp of the fda process or streamlining the drug companies' procedures instead of just finding more money to pay for them? >> well, that's a great question. i think one of the problems we have, particularly for seniors, is there is no prescription drug coverage in medicare. and therefore, when they have to try to purchase drugs they do so on their own, there's no kind of collective bargaining, no power of purchasing among seniors. so i think step one to make sure prescription drugs is more affordable for seniors, and those are the folks who really rely upon prescription drugs a lot these days, is to reform the medicare system, is to have prescription drugs as an integral part of medicare once and for all. the problem we have today is like the patient's bill of rights, particularly with health care, there's a lot of bickering in washington, d.c. it's kind of like a political issue as opposed to a people issue. so what i want to do is i want to call upon republicans and democrats to forget all the arguing and finger pointing, and come
. deductions for health care costs, educational write off. that's where the biggest pot of money is. since the romney team won't say that's where they're going -- when you talk about historic tax reduction, you can't compare the deep reductions from the kennedy era when we had 96% marginal tax rates and dropping those significantly and in the reagan era where you had a significant steep cut in the marginal tax rate, then you compare that with the clinton era where we increased marginal tax rates and had the longest sustained period of accelerated economic growth in our recent history. you can't compare. >> as interesting as all this is. this went over the head of 60% of the public out there. they would need an economics class to understand what's going on. this go goes to the core point. if you don't understand basic economics, this doesn't make any sense to you. you won't learn this from a debate. that's where the challenge is from. >> my favorite thing on taking things that i don't understand and making them clear. on the blog fact check he talks about this $5 trillion question and the f
cut down talks completely on jobs and wanting to cut the education credit. the president signed the "dream act," and hundreds of thousands of students are able to get their education. i am educated. i put my son through law school. it is his birthday today on columbus day, october 8. we moved to california when i was 8 years old. my mother remarried and my stepfather was a marine at camp pendleton and coronado. host: thank you for the call. guest: everything she said, i disagree with. she did talk about lowering the cost of education for kids getting into college. that is significant. she also talked about the blue part of the state that has really struggled. over the last 30 or 35 years. it's now starting to come back with a gas and oil industry, making sure that it is safe, with the steel industry, it's starting to come back. and certainly with the automotive industry. we have to be positive about those kind of things. if we continuously be rated president and start saying government is not working, voters react to that. jay and i know that go to washington or columbus, they d
the educational experience of all pupils. >> caller: that's good. i guess it goes back to the case the was deemed moot anyway, but the fact of the matter is when you are laying on that table and you are about to have brain surgery, it doesn't matter what color the surgeon is. i don't care if he is black, white, it doesn't make any difference. the fact of the matter is if they were granted admission to school simply based on the fact of their skin color, that in itself is discriminatory. >> host: okay. carroll. oklahoma city. independent. good morning. >> caller: good morning. i would say that i hope [inaudible] they don't intervene because that affirmative action of white women versus african-american women for jobs and positions and i think it is being used in that respect. hopefully the supreme court will step down and allow it to continue as it is. >> host: okay. new hampshire. the democratic call. good morning, now three. what are your thoughts? >> caller: i just think it's unfortunate that today we need this kind of law we. look at the ayaan to leave the unemployment rate on its higher among
on banks and insurance companies. we cannot got our investments on education, clean energy, research, technology. that is not a plan to grow the economy. that is not change. we have been there. we have tried that. we are not going back. we are moving forward. that is why i am running for a second term as president of the united states. [applause] look -- we have got a different view about how you bring jobs and prosperity to america. the strong economy does not trickle down from the top. it grows from a thriving middle- class, and folks working hard to get into the middle-class. i think it is time our tax code stopped rewarding companies that ship jobs overseas. let us reward small businesses and manufacturing here in ohio, products made in america. that is the choice in this election. i believe we can create more jobs by controlling more of our own energy. after 30 years of inaction, we raised fuel standards. by the middle of the next decade, your cars and trucks would go twice as far on a gallon of gas. today, the u.s. is less dependent on foreign oil than at any time in two decade
for their college education and she's voted to increase taxes on the middle class through the ryan plan. all of this in order to keep tax breaks for multi-millionaires and tax breaks and subsidies for corporations who ship jobs overseas. we're going to reduce the deficits by bringing home our troops from afghanistan, by making sure that we create jobs right here in the district, by making sure that we decrease taxes on the middle class and small businesses, and by allowing medicare to negotiate drug prices with our pharmaceutical companies so that we can tackle the real problem, which is our health care costs and eliminate unnecessary procedures and redundant tests. >> all right, thank you, dr. ruiz. congresswoman, you have one minute. >> i don't think he understood the question, because what he just said, he's going to reduce the debt by not having so many medical tests, which, by the way, is a major part of obama care. obama care is what cut medicare by $716 billion on. let me tell you a few specific things i would do immediately to cut the debt. first of all, i would repeal obama care as
versus board of education, and he ordered the integration of the central high school in little rock and the demonstrations there which blocked the desegregation eisenhower ordered the 101st airborne division from fort campbell to little rock to enforce desegregation with a forceful message to everyone in the south that the desegregation integration was the loss of land and eisenhower was going to support it with the armed forces of the united states. what a powerful message. [applause] but finally, eisenhower did not take the lead in rgb advantages of integration as john f. kennedy and lyndon johnson to. eisenhower felt this was a difficult till -- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurab
board of education is sparking a fire storm affecting every florida school. this week officials released a plan setting different expectations for students of different races. for example, the plan calls for 90% of asian students to be at or above grade level reading in 2018 compared to 74% of black students. similar standards apply to math. the school board aims to improve performance of k through 12 students. parents worry the students won't be held in the same standards like they were in the real world. welcome to you. i also want to note that the state's education commissioner agreed to come on but declined late yesterday saying she had a prior commitment. so do you think the plan is racist. >> i don't know if i would call the plan racist. we need to call hout the board of education for making a concession that really just reinscribes our perceptions about race from the past the problem with this particular set of bempbl marks is it mixes concession that essentially some groups will not perform as others when they really need a cohesive statewide benchmark that cuts across race and d
and education, hall said this about scientists who come before his committee to talk about the reality of climate change. quote, i think we ought to listen to them. i just don't think we ought to mind them. that's a thinker. their colleague, jim sensenbrenner, has called the idea of climate change an international conspiracy and scientific fascism. heard enough? don't forget about todd akin. he has a slot on the science committee, he and his theory that in legitimate cases of rape the woman can't get pregnant. >>> up next, republicans probably figured they had the senate seat in arizona all wrapped up, but richard carmona has come out of nowhere and coming on strong. now we have a race out there. richard carmona joins us next. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. >>> welcome back to "hardball." arizona's democratic senate candidate richard carmona has an inspiring biography that's nearly cuss mom made for politics. he dropped out of high school, went to vietnam, and became a decorated combat veteran. he got a ged, got a medical degree, and went on to become surgeon gener
jobs. we cannot slow up on education because that's the engine that is going to give us the economic growth and competitiveness that we need. and we are not going to slow up on the whole idea of providing for affordable health care for americans, none of which when we get to talk about health care is as my, as the governor characterized, characterized. the bottom line here is that we are going to, in fact, eliminate those wasteful spending that exist in the budget right now. a number of things i don't have time because the light is blinking that i won't be able to mention, but one of which is the $100 billion tax dodge that, in fact, allows people to take their post office box offshore, avoid taxes. i call that unpatriotic. i call that unpatriotic. that's what i'm talking about. >> moderator: governor? palin: well, the nice thing about running with john mccain is i can assure you he doesn't tell one thing to one group and then turns around and tells something else to another group, including his plans that will make this bailout plan, this rescue plan even better. i want to go back t
of the expenditures in the tax code are not loopholes at all. tax preferences, things like a college education and retirement savings belong in the tax code even after reform happens. they were put in the code on purpose, to make a middle-class lifestyle accessible and sustainable for american families. tax reform recognized this in 1986 even as we cleared out the underbrush of loopholes, which preserved versions of the mortgage interest deduction, the charitable deduction, the state and local property tax deduction. realized that as much as we want to make the code more efficient, these provisions were two essential to middle-class households. we have to abide by the same principle today. if we seek to protect the expenditures that are most essential to the middle-class, we still hope to reduce the deficit and we will need to find alternative revenue sources. this leads to the second principle of this new model for tax reform -- the tax rate for the highest earners should probably return to clinton-era levels and stay somewhere around there. this will come as heresy to some of those on the ot
improvements in public education, safety, welfare reform, and i described how worked with leaders in the other party to get results for the people. the bad economy, his decision, his choice serving as national party chairman rather than focusing on the economic crisis in virginia. it is the great, and answer a question in this campaign. how does a governor decide to take on a second job, giving partisan speeches, well over 100,000 jobs are lost here in virginia. if he had given his governorship the full attention, he might have avoided some mistakes like increase in college tuition by over 40%. if he had been listening to the people of virginia who are really facing tough times, he might not have proposed raising taxes on working people, working women, seniors, small business owners, and people earning $17,000. he might tip been against the sequestration deal threatening jobs in virginia right now. but he made different choices. soon, you'll get to choose. if i have the honor of being your senator, i will give all my energy to working with both parties and getting america us sending once again
take race into account in fashioning their student bodies to make sure there is educational diversity. >> what is the university of system for acceptance? guest: bic most kids from the top 10 system, the top 10 percentage of schools in texas. then it is about 75% of the class. the of a 25% is admitted on the way that most universities admit, the look of the entire file, academic credentials, but all other factors, life experiences, rick and assist the city -- race and ethnicity. the last part is what abigail objects to. there is no role for the government to be sort of people by race. >> the university of texas of austin's has what? guest: they say the supreme court has endorsed education and diversity as a compelling goal for the government and an exception to the usual rule that the government should not be classified people by race. it is true, and a 5-4 decision, the supreme court said that, but the key vote, sandra day o'connor, has retired, replaced by a more conservative judge, samuel alito, so in that they give us a new result. >> what is the result of this, who will hear it,
and accountability. i'm talking especially about his education reform and welfare reform and his police reforms. when they didn't work, their answer was always more money. but we have learned from experience the governments must focus on product that comes out of an agency, not on the tax revenue that goes into an agency. [applause] in new york city we have seen how accountability and innovation has led to transformation. in public safety, public education and public assistance. crime in new york city is down more than 30% compared to a decade ago and high school graduations are up 40% and welfare rolls are up 25%. that didn't just happen because i spend more money. it happened because accountability and innovation has become an integral part of the work. it's not easy. it never is. they will always be doomsayers. i also know that tough problems are not solved by an waving a magic wand and charting the right course rather than the easy course takes courage to the and i don't have any doubt that david cameron has the courage of the convictions and i believe that he is charting the right course from br
both of us. she is about 23 years old. she was educated at pepperdine university. she is working for "the daily caller." i want you to hear what she says from her perspective on journalism and get your reaction to it. >> i feel as though twitter and facebook have enabled people who maybe are not in the media and not have a loud voice to become one of the loudest voices in the media. we see people like matt drudge who has no connection to the media, is a political outsider, and look how far he has come. he took advantage and saw the potential of the new medium, the internet, internet journalism, and his voice is just as loud as the media establishment. >> reaction? >> appalled. i am appalled. i do not know quite what she thinks -- this is a good idea? >> she does. >> i think it is a dreadful idea. good journalism, good reporting must work in the constraints of great editing. it has to. i ran into trouble a few years ago, giving a speech at some award in canada. i was talking about so-called citizen journalism. i said i would trust it as much as i would trust the citizen survey. yo
are as opposed to what they are called technically. i really wish we had a catchy term for tax-exempt educational group. via things like like semi-super pac or something that would allow us to shorthanded. it would probably help a lot in the educational aspect. for readers. >> they get five o. one c. four and were out of here. editors don't want to see. >> the acronym would be excited. >> so what i see as we are entering a universe, where brad probably thinks this is positive, where more money is flying outside of party institutions, outside of candidates. more of a controlled by constellations of political operatives and donors with ties to different candidates. and that is where i see us going. i think it is a consultant strain. i mean, it is like a gold mine for political consultants. you can make so much money you don't have to answer to candidates or candidates spouses or travel anywhere. they just sit in a control room in alexandria, cut ads, collect checks, read polls. it's a great job and it is the future of politics. >> so we have a whole bunch of questions here and also people on twitte
of education came up last week several times in the debate. i know this is an issue as a state legislature that you have worked a lot on. >> it is the arizona state legislature sadly is known for being the state that has cut education the most the deeper per capita over the last several years, so arizona schools are struggling, and i teach at arizona state university -- >> bill: oh, wow. >> i have been teaching there for ten years now. before they was a social worker at an elementary school. so this is a really important issue for me. my own story, i think informs why it is important to me. i was homeless when i was a kid, and it was through public education, pell grants academic scholarships that i was able to make it to the middle class and in arizona we're struggling to keep that high-quality education system, and this is a top issue in our race. my opponent wants to eliminate the department of education which would get rid of pell grants. it would eliminate after ford loans, work study program withes, and cut close to a billion dollars of funding from arizona sch
. >> students have are having a hard time paying for school so voting is important for education purposes. >> i don't think cutting taxes or protecting the wealthy is the way to go. >> i was lucky enough to find a job at the beginning of the summer, but it's really difficult to find a job when you're a college student. >> interesting. those students were in line to get tickets for president obama's speech later this week at the university of miami. in 2008, senator obama beat senator john mccain by 2 to 1 in the margin in the youth vote in this country. it's crucial for the president to get similar numbers this time around if he's going to win the state of florida. of course, to vote they must be registered and voter registration drives have been underway for months. according to statistics from the florida secretary of state, democrats have 500,000 more registered voters than republicans. now, there are 2.8 million people registered as independents or with a third party. the numbers are interesting, but it means nothing if there's no emotional component that will motivate them to do it. this i
of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. at the guaranteed's lowest price.attresses plus, pay no interest for 3 years on the best brand-name mattress sets. get your best rest ever from sleep train. ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ >>> i, too, want to avoid any personal attacks. i promise not to bring up your singing. so i -- >> i promise not to sing. >> an editorial in "the los angeles times" said, in addition to his uncontrolled verbosity, biden is a gaffe machine. can you reassure voters in this country that you would have the discipline you would need on the world stage, senator? >> yes. >> thank you, senator biden. >> joining us now is the deputy campaign manager for the obama/biden campaign, stephanie cutter. stephanie cutter, thank you very much for being with us tonight. i appreciate your time. >> good talking to you. >> so we have been talking on this stage and everybody in the country has been talking about the impact of
who get out, have enough of them that they are educating us about the truth of life in north korea. there've been several books published and we now have a much better picture of what the truth of the existence is there. but the north korean refugees are performing a second equally important function. i do believe more important. they are hoping their own information starved homeland, just as the world now knows more about north koreans, north koreans still far more about the period. this is to thanks to the efforts of north koreans who have escaped. how did they do that? think a minute. an immigrant. with the first thing he wants to do? he wants to let his family back home know he's okay and tell them about his new life. before a north korean who wants to do that, it's next to impossible. you can't make a phone call to north korea. you can't send an e-mail or text message or facebook and you can't even mail a letter. so the exiles have created a black market in information. they hire chinese careerist across the border and deliver messages, or sometimes they deliver chinese cellph
. they apply the worldwide economics of the labor market place to your value. a poorly educated semi motivated american worker is not a very valuable commodity on the world market. that is the problem. if he went the economy to improve -- if you want the economy to approve, we need to be nationalists -- global financial dominance is what is killing us. the investor class is ruining the worker class of america. host: 4 you yourself, has your idea of the american dream changed in the last couple of years? caller: i have been very fortunate. i would say it has. i am much more cynical now. there seems to be a minority of americans that believe the most important thing in the world is to get rich as soon as they can and they do not care how they do it. that is killing 80% of the american workers in this country. host: mary, where are you calling us from? caller: illinois. from what i heard from the last caller, i a greed. we cannot expect to be forever the super power most important person in the whole universe. we have to be part of the world and deal with what is out there. it is changing. host:
know, we have a crisis in education in this country. and, you know, by most measures and some different coordination when you look at where the united states is, you know, whether it's early childhood education or math scores for high school students, we're often not even in the top 50 any more where we used to be at the top. i think it's important to have, you know, material for young kids to be interested in, and, you know, my experience has been that kids are interested in astronauts and space and they are also interested in animals. so i put the two there together and hopefully they will be interested in this book. >> hopefully they will want to be astronauts one day like my son who is in the building today. i thought it was the most incredible moments at the democratic convention when your wife gabrielle giffords led the pledge of allegiance. it brought some people to tears. >> i was in back stage trying to watch with a lot of other people. i didn't get the full experience. it was a great moment for the people not only watching on tv but those in the stadium, but it was, you know,
the president -- in educate the gateway to opportunity. [cheering and applause] across our most beautiful state, we have an abundance of sun and wind and geothermal. that's why i stand up and fight for our clean energy entrepreneurs and workers who are making nevada the clean energy jobs capital of the united states of america. [cheering and applause] and when it comes to our seniors, who have worked so hard their entire lives, i stand up and i fight so when they retire, we can have dignity and peace of mind knowing that their medicare and social security will be there for them in future generations. [cheering and applause] education, energy, veteran's benefits, medicare, social security, along with women's rights and welcome is what -- [cheering and applause] that's is what is at stake this november. on issue after issue president obama is moving us forward by rebuilding an economy that ensures that all americans who work hard, play by the rules, students, parents, hard-working men and women in nevada can build economic security and live the american dream. [cheering and applause] president ob
that can pass through metal detectors. he voted against the department of education. he voted against funding for meals on wheels for seniors. he voted against a holiday for martin luther king. he voted against a resolution calling for the release of nelson mandela in south africa. it's amazing to hear him criticize my record or john kerry's . >> his record speaks for itself and it's not very distinguished. host: we are talking about vice- presidential debates with tonight's debate in danville, ky. what matters? and you saw a moment from 2004 and from our archives. if your interested in watching that and other moments, c- span.org. professor, tonight when viewers are watching the split screen of the debate and they see vice president joe biden and a younger paul ryan, what will the impact been? in the shot from 2004, you get the split screen dynamic, but tonight people will get that. calguest: the split screen is very significant in terms of the debate. when obama and running scared off, the split screen did a lot of damage to obama. it was not necessarily what obama said, but what pe
with him. >> i do not know of any government program that john is supporting. not early education. the reason no child was left behind is the money is left behind. with regard to the role of vice president, i had a long talk, as a sure the governor did, with her principal, with a rock. i have a history of getting things done in the united states senate. -- with barack. i have a history of getting things done in united states senate, as john mccain nos. i would be the point person on getting things done. when asked if i wanted a portfolio, my response was no, but for rock obama indicated he wanted me with him to help him govern, so every decision he makes, i will be sitting with him in the room to give him advice -- but for rock -- but barack obama indicated he wanted me in the room to help him govern. i look forward to working with barack and playing a very constructive role in his presidency, bringing about the kind of change this country needs. >> from 2008, in st. louis, the vice presidential debate, robert watson, let me pick up on something we discussed earlier, which is how
, on energy policy, and he used it against him on education policy. but, during the section on entitlements, he didn't necessarily seem to be at his strongest. but... certainly much stronger than the president. >> chris: i want to ask you about a moment you didn't bring up, that has gotten a lot of attention, let's take a look at this one. >> i'm sorry, jim, i'm going to stop the subsidy to pbs and stop other things. i like pbs and i love big bird and i like you, too but i will not keep spending money on things to borrow money from china to pay for it. >> chris: now was that smart, as a way to show that he is serious about cutting spending or always a mistake to take on big bird? >> well, you know, big bird is pretty popular but, you know, maybe the president would say big bird didn't build his own nest, i don't know. but, you know, i think that it is -- you know, it probably, you know, maybe not going after big bird, but, certainly, pbs, and, public broadcasting is popular in terms of taking them on in the spending, you know, on the spending side. i don't think he was going down the wrong
. there are, of course, moderates in iran. half of the country is weste westernized, highly educated. and there are moderates, but they don't run the country. on october 9th, 2012, who runs iran? do we still not know? >> in the intelligence business, iran is right up there with north korea as probably the hardest targets to really understand. >> certainly not ahmadinejad. >> no. supreme leader. >> it's the supreme leader along with -- >> the mullulahs. >> aren't they intimidated by the revolutionary guard? >> you've got the people financially essential to the regime. several power centers. but -- >> the supreme leader is first. and the answer is we don't really know. >> if we don't know that, the strategy here also psychological? and at what point do you start doing this publicly? isn't that a second step? start doing this publicly and aligning with the opposition publicly? isn't that to an extent potentially a destructive strategy if you're a little hand fisted about it? >> i would do it rather than later because the guys are feeling the heat. at the end of the day, mika, they've go
it into a voucher. we have real challenges to meet. children to educate, a class to rebuild. >> one more note within this past hour, the president left on a two-day campaign swing through california, on a campaign effort, how else do you think they pay for those ads? >> hey, you don't miss much, do you, alex? >> talking about the unemployment number, we also saw a strong debate, still about the debate. >> well, you know it is a good thing for the president's supporters and they're looking forward to it. he gets two more bites of the apple, when vp paul ryan goes up against joe biden, and candidates have less and less tried to paint it as a victory, nobody agrees with it. and david axelrod said the president let mitt romney get away with too much. the president is his own worst critic. and robert gibbs, of course, works directly for the campaign, and newt gingrich talked more about the campaign, let's have a little bit more of a listen. >> it is not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations he has for himself. but look, i think part of that was because as i sai
in on those promises. it is government negligence to educate its foreign students and require them to leave. no place should do that. it is part of the economic strategy for growth in the future. you want to be a magnet for the best talents in the world. we will compete for the best talents. we have the best environment for that talent. >> energy and then campaign finance. >> you are looking at california right now. their massive increases in the costs. when consumers are paying for gasoline, they're not able to purchase their basic commodities every day. what is happening? governor brown is proposing a relaxation of regulation that impact energy industry. that is clearly a concession that regulation drives the costs of energy. we need to have the same focus of discussion in washington. what is happening in california can happen -- >> it is harder to buy gas in california and hawaii, from what i heard. -- than hawaii, from what i heard. >> if you have a stool with two legs, it will fall over. look at what the canadians did with their cash cow. we have more of a cash cow in energy than anyon
to her life may not be over yet. >> she was attacked and shot by have an education and don'trls want girls to speak for themselves and don't want girls to become leaders. so you say men are superior drivers? yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? megyn: well, the showdown is set to go tonight here in danville, kentucky. this is the stage where vice president biden and congressman paul ryan will go toe to toe. four years ago some said joe biden was careful not to be too aggressive in his match-up with governor sarah palin. but today there is word of a very different plan. they are saying the gloves will be off. the 2008 debate in st. louis was one of the most-watched ever for the vice presidential candidates, 70 million tv viewers tuned in. and here's a look back at some of the most memorable moments. [cheers and applause] >> nice to meet you. hey, can i call you joe? >> you sure can. >> okay, thanks. thank you, gwen. thank you.
said earlier today better, more resources than other countries and a very well-educated population system, although the libyan education system lacks in many ways as we know. but libya, their scenarios -- and i'm happy to talk about it in the q&a -- where libya comes out better than tunisia and egypt because it has those special, special types of resources that could come together to avoid a somalia-like situation. um, just quickly on tunisia, um, and i apologize to those who have heard me speak on this before, i saw the tunisia arab spring as kind of two, split in two to oversimplify. but there was a rural, male, older, more working class, more up employed, angrier arab spring based a lot on the algerian protest which has been sort of roiling since 2005, and there was an urban, both gender, younger, more middle and upper class, more socially networked, more employed, more hopeful, more human rights-oriented arab spring which kind of pushed the revolution over the top. and that's that secondary wrap spring in tunisia revolution that worked because of that. but the first one hasn't
. useused it against the presidet on energy policy and used it against them on education policy. but during the section on he entitlements he didn't necessarily seem to be at his strongest but still certainly much stronger than the president. >> chris: i want to ask you about a moment that you didn't bring up that has got and lot of attention. let's take a look at this one. >> i'm sorry, jim, i'm going to stop the subsidy to pbs and other things. i love big bird and i actually like you, too. i'm not going to keep on spending money on things to borrow money from china to pay for are it. >> was that smart as a way to show that he is serious about cutting spend or is it always a mistake to take on big bird? >> well, big bird is pretty popular but maybe the president would say big bird didn't build his own nest, i don't know. but i think that it is -- it probably maybe not going after big bird but is certainly pbs and public broadcasting is popular in terms of taking them on in the spending side. i don't think he was going down the wrong path. maybe not so much with big bird. >> chris: a couple
education and intern program has offered our nation's most promising conservative students an intensive, on the job education in news analysis, reporting, marketing, and fund-raising. unlike the typical washington, d.c. internship experience, mrc interns play a meaningful and integral role helping to advance both the miss of the mrc and the conservative cause. upon joining the mrc, following a highly competitive selection process, interns are emersed in the strategies and best practices of journalism, marketing, filming, and fund-raising. many mrc interns go on to successful full-time careers with the mrc, where they continue to grow professionally. many others join other prominent conservative organizations or political campaigns, leveraging their mrc experience to help advance conservatism in a variety of unique ways. i'm proud of the great work mrc interns have done over the years and continue to do on behalf of the conservative cause. mrc interns make a real impact across every mrc department. they are truly part of the mrc family. ♪ . [applause] >> there was another video made a
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